Down Delaware
Pictured from furthest to closest: Frank A. Sedita City Court, Buffalo City Hall (peering), Robert H. Jackson Federal Courthouse, 130 Delaware Ave. (partial), New Era Cap Headquarters (partial), the Avant, and Hampton Inn.
Photograph by Geoff Dude

Down Delaware

Pictured from furthest to closest: Frank A. Sedita City Court, Buffalo City Hall (peering), Robert H. Jackson Federal Courthouse, 130 Delaware Ave. (partial), New Era Cap Headquarters (partial), the Avant, and Hampton Inn.

Photograph by Geoff Dude

Creative Commons License

The Earliest Picture of Buffalo Known - View of Fort Erie From Buffalo Creek - 1811, Drawn by E. Walsh 49th British Regiment

Idea Summit

One Region Forward and the UB School of Architecture and Planning are holding an Idea Summit October 4th at NorthPark Cinema. The Idea Summit will feature products of the Citizen Planning School, a united effort by the two organizations to empower citizens to develop and implement sustainable plans within their communities. The free celebratory event will feature key-note speaker Megan McNally, founder of Rusted Grain and co-founder of The Foundry.

Colorized Niagara Street - 1908
See original.
Colorized by Sanna Dullaway

Colorized Niagara Street - 1908

See original.

Colorized by Sanna Dullaway

Taptrails
Buffalo’s resurgence has been fueled by entrepreneurship and nowhere is that more prevalent than in the growing microbrew culture sweeping the region. To celebrate the Buffalo Niagara Brewers Association is holding their annual Buffalo Beer Week this week which is debuting a new way to explore the nearly 20 local breweries in the Buffalo Niagara area.
Taptrails is another entrepreneurial idea based out of Buffalo but is quickly spreading across multiple states with local brewing cultures. For $10 beer connoisseurs can purchase a map that features discounts from local breweries as well as further information on the local brewing culture and soon will be available through app form.

Taptrails

Buffalo’s resurgence has been fueled by entrepreneurship and nowhere is that more prevalent than in the growing microbrew culture sweeping the region. To celebrate the Buffalo Niagara Brewers Association is holding their annual Buffalo Beer Week this week which is debuting a new way to explore the nearly 20 local breweries in the Buffalo Niagara area.

Taptrails is another entrepreneurial idea based out of Buffalo but is quickly spreading across multiple states with local brewing cultures. For $10 beer connoisseurs can purchase a map that features discounts from local breweries as well as further information on the local brewing culture and soon will be available through app form.

Hidden Behind Elmwood

Photography by Robert Thuerck

Creative Commons License

Area cultural institutions to offer free admission Saturday
Over 12 museums and cultural institutions will offer free admission in Buffalo and the surrounding area this Saturday, September 27th. Led by the Smithsonian Magazine’s “Museum Day Live!” campaign institutions all across the nation are inviting people to check them out for no cost for one day. Around Buffalo they include:
Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo History Museum, Buffalo Museum of Science, Buffalo Niagara Heritage Village in Amherst, Buffalo Religious Arts Center, Burchfield Penney Art Center, the Colored Musicians Club, Fenton History Center in Jamestown, Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum in North Tonawanda, Lower Lakes Marine Historical Society, Nash House Museum, Steel Plant Museum and the Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural Site.
Photograph by davehogan

Area cultural institutions to offer free admission Saturday

Over 12 museums and cultural institutions will offer free admission in Buffalo and the surrounding area this Saturday, September 27th. Led by the Smithsonian Magazine’s “Museum Day Live!” campaign institutions all across the nation are inviting people to check them out for no cost for one day. Around Buffalo they include:

Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo History Museum, Buffalo Museum of Science, Buffalo Niagara Heritage Village in Amherst, Buffalo Religious Arts Center, Burchfield Penney Art Center, the Colored Musicians Club, Fenton History Center in Jamestown, Herschell Carrousel Factory Museum in North Tonawanda, Lower Lakes Marine Historical Society, Nash House Museum, Steel Plant Museum and the Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural Site.

Photograph by davehogan

Is Buffalo one of the “next hipster cities” in America?
Last year Buffalo was rated as one of the most underrated cities for 20 somethings by Business Insider. Then, at the turn of the new year the Washington Post called Austin out and Buffalo in for 2014. When Austin-based Lauren Modery of Hipstercrite read that in the Post she begrudgingly had to see for herself and admits coming away as a “Buffaliever.” Now she has written an article about it in Austin-based Culture Map recognizing Buffalo as a next potential “hipster city.” Modery mentions Buffalo’s architecture, bike friendly culture, “charming” neighborhoods, and mix of old and new as reasons that should attract hipsters.

Is Buffalo one of the “next hipster cities” in America?

Last year Buffalo was rated as one of the most underrated cities for 20 somethings by Business Insider. Then, at the turn of the new year the Washington Post called Austin out and Buffalo in for 2014. When Austin-based Lauren Modery of Hipstercrite read that in the Post she begrudgingly had to see for herself and admits coming away as a “Buffaliever.” Now she has written an article about it in Austin-based Culture Map recognizing Buffalo as a next potential “hipster city.” Modery mentions Buffalo’s architecture, bike friendly culture, “charming” neighborhoods, and mix of old and new as reasons that should attract hipsters.

It’s Always Dangerous to Believe in the Bills
Grantland has focused more than most other media outlets on the Bills fan experience which is ravenously loyal despite 14 seasons out of the playoffs. Buffalo has been ranked as the top tailgating city in the nation and ranks 11th in NFL TV ratings despite being one of the smallest market teams in the NFL. Two years ago Grantland came out with an extensive article entitled, The Glorious Plight of the Buffalo Bills.
In the most recent article the author focuses on Buffalo’s stunning 2-0 start and the all-too-common feeling of impotence that overcame fans during last week’s game against San Diego. Buffalo is ripe for an upset and enticingly lures fans into believing that the season is finally here for a win but that can be dangerous given the history of frequent on-field tragedies.

It’s Always Dangerous to Believe in the Bills

Grantland has focused more than most other media outlets on the Bills fan experience which is ravenously loyal despite 14 seasons out of the playoffs. Buffalo has been ranked as the top tailgating city in the nation and ranks 11th in NFL TV ratings despite being one of the smallest market teams in the NFL. Two years ago Grantland came out with an extensive article entitled, The Glorious Plight of the Buffalo Bills.

In the most recent article the author focuses on Buffalo’s stunning 2-0 start and the all-too-common feeling of impotence that overcame fans during last week’s game against San Diego. Buffalo is ripe for an upset and enticingly lures fans into believing that the season is finally here for a win but that can be dangerous given the history of frequent on-field tragedies.

Ebony Escapes! to Buffalo
One of the oldest African American newspapers in the United States has written an excellent writeup on Buffalo. Beginning with an insightful and condensed history of the city the author then goes into where Buffalo finds itself today and ends with just some of the attractions that draw people to the city. Claiming she only scratched the surface on Buffalo the writer promises more on what she finds to be truly the City of Good Neighbors:

"One of the first things you notice about Buffalo is that it possesses a small town feel with big city sensibilities. The people here are genuinely friendly, and it is one of the few places where most everyone you encounter was born and bred here. It was not until recently that you’d find people not from Buffalo. You’ll find Buffalonians to be hardworking and fiercely loyal to preserving, promoting and celebrating Buffalo’s unique aspects, all while trying to redefine its identity after the long-ago decline of the steel industry and departure from a purely blue-collar town."

Ebony Escapes! to Buffalo

One of the oldest African American newspapers in the United States has written an excellent writeup on Buffalo. Beginning with an insightful and condensed history of the city the author then goes into where Buffalo finds itself today and ends with just some of the attractions that draw people to the city. Claiming she only scratched the surface on Buffalo the writer promises more on what she finds to be truly the City of Good Neighbors:

"One of the first things you notice about Buffalo is that it possesses a small town feel with big city sensibilities. The people here are genuinely friendly, and it is one of the few places where most everyone you encounter was born and bred here. It was not until recently that you’d find people not from Buffalo. You’ll find Buffalonians to be hardworking and fiercely loyal to preserving, promoting and celebrating Buffalo’s unique aspects, all while trying to redefine its identity after the long-ago decline of the steel industry and departure from a purely blue-collar town."

SolarCity job projection triples to 3,000; company to invest $5 billion
The Riverbend site is ready for construction of the largest solar panel factory in the Western Hemisphere. Plans for the brownfield site were announced last November when $225 million of the Buffalo Billion lured two promising but unknown clean energy companies to Buffalo to take part in a high-tech innovation hub with the hope of creating 1,000 jobs.
Then Elon Musk’s company, SolarCity, bought one of the small companies. Now Riverbend is going to be the epicenter of the Americas’ solar panel production promising three to five times as many jobs than originally planned. To compare the $5 billion investment it is more than twice as much as Terry Pegula has spent on building Harborcenter and purchasing both the Buffalo Sabres and Bills combined; and that’s excluding the total $750 million investment by the state.
Now a center for clean energy production Buffalo continues to gain momentum for being seen as a city on the move in the 21st century. Buffalo will maintain its reputation as a factory town but what can the people of Buffalo learn from the last giant plant that was so openly embraced?

SolarCity job projection triples to 3,000; company to invest $5 billion

The Riverbend site is ready for construction of the largest solar panel factory in the Western Hemisphere. Plans for the brownfield site were announced last November when $225 million of the Buffalo Billion lured two promising but unknown clean energy companies to Buffalo to take part in a high-tech innovation hub with the hope of creating 1,000 jobs.

Then Elon Musk’s company, SolarCity, bought one of the small companies. Now Riverbend is going to be the epicenter of the Americas’ solar panel production promising three to five times as many jobs than originally planned. To compare the $5 billion investment it is more than twice as much as Terry Pegula has spent on building Harborcenter and purchasing both the Buffalo Sabres and Bills combined; and that’s excluding the total $750 million investment by the state.

Now a center for clean energy production Buffalo continues to gain momentum for being seen as a city on the move in the 21st century. Buffalo will maintain its reputation as a factory town but what can the people of Buffalo learn from the last giant plant that was so openly embraced?

City’s Oldest Synagogue - Demolition Alert
The century-old Jefferson Street Shul, built in 1903, is a reminder that Buffalo is a city of all faiths. Unfortunately, a fresh demolition notice appeared last week and without serious intervention the shul will join other iconic religious buildings into oblivion. Over the weekend Buffalo’s Young Preservationists committed to reboarding and securing the building but more will be needed to save this historic and architecturally significant structure.
The Jefferson Shul and Broadway’s St. Ann’s Church are two architecturally significant religious buildings that are in immediate need of a financial intervention. Once buildings like these are destroyed they can never again be rebuilt and it’s this historic architecture that makes the city beautiful.
Photo courtesy of David Torke, fixBuffalo

City’s Oldest Synagogue - Demolition Alert

The century-old Jefferson Street Shul, built in 1903, is a reminder that Buffalo is a city of all faiths. Unfortunately, a fresh demolition notice appeared last week and without serious intervention the shul will join other iconic religious buildings into oblivion. Over the weekend Buffalo’s Young Preservationists committed to reboarding and securing the building but more will be needed to save this historic and architecturally significant structure.

The Jefferson Shul and Broadway’s St. Ann’s Church are two architecturally significant religious buildings that are in immediate need of a financial intervention. Once buildings like these are destroyed they can never again be rebuilt and it’s this historic architecture that makes the city beautiful.

Photo courtesy of David Torke, fixBuffalo

Insured rate in Buffalo Niagara beats New York and nation
While the rest of the nation struggles over health insurance coverage Buffalo has had some of the lowest uninsured rates in both New York and the United States as a whole. Buffalo’s low percentage of uninsured people at 6% nearly cuts the state’s 11% average in half and blows away the national average which is at 15%.
Buffalo does have a higher percentage of people on Medicare compared to both the state and national average but Buffalo also has one of the highest percentage of employer-provided insurance at 62% compared to New York’s 57% and the country’s 54%. Buffalo is a national model for encouraging employer-provided insurance while still covering those who have the most difficult time affording it.

Insured rate in Buffalo Niagara beats New York and nation

While the rest of the nation struggles over health insurance coverage Buffalo has had some of the lowest uninsured rates in both New York and the United States as a whole. Buffalo’s low percentage of uninsured people at 6% nearly cuts the state’s 11% average in half and blows away the national average which is at 15%.

Buffalo does have a higher percentage of people on Medicare compared to both the state and national average but Buffalo also has one of the highest percentage of employer-provided insurance at 62% compared to New York’s 57% and the country’s 54%. Buffalo is a national model for encouraging employer-provided insurance while still covering those who have the most difficult time affording it.

'Buffalo Billion' expanding to city's East Side
So far Governor Cuomo’s Buffalo Billion has focused on bringing business to the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus, creating a clean energy hub at Riverbend, creating a park at the Outer Harbor, and increasing tourism at Niagara Falls. Now $6.7 million is being invested in buying abandoned industrial property along prime railroad real estate in the struggling East Side for the purpose of a business park. The state purchase of the land comes shortly after the Buffalo Urban Development Corp. purchased 11 acres for $250,000 in the same vicinity.
The exact details of the business park have yet to be revealed but the focus will be on manufacturing and energy. The acquisitions come shortly after the announcement of a $70 million privately funded housing development project, Highland Park, located less than a mile north. Also located within a mile of these two projects are ECMC, Sister’s Hospital, UB’s School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, St. Mary’s School for the Deaf, and Canisius College making the near East Side between Ferry and Amherst primed to be the next neighborhood engine to restart in Buffalo’s revitalization revolution. 

'Buffalo Billion' expanding to city's East Side

So far Governor Cuomo’s Buffalo Billion has focused on bringing business to the Buffalo Niagara Medical Campus, creating a clean energy hub at Riverbend, creating a park at the Outer Harbor, and increasing tourism at Niagara Falls. Now $6.7 million is being invested in buying abandoned industrial property along prime railroad real estate in the struggling East Side for the purpose of a business park. The state purchase of the land comes shortly after the Buffalo Urban Development Corp. purchased 11 acres for $250,000 in the same vicinity.

The exact details of the business park have yet to be revealed but the focus will be on manufacturing and energy. The acquisitions come shortly after the announcement of a $70 million privately funded housing development project, Highland Park, located less than a mile north. Also located within a mile of these two projects are ECMC, Sister’s Hospital, UB’s School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, St. Mary’s School for the Deaf, and Canisius College making the near East Side between Ferry and Amherst primed to be the next neighborhood engine to restart in Buffalo’s revitalization revolution